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Bandon

Bandon LighthouseBandon is in Coos County, on the south side of the mouth of the Coquille River. The first permanent settlers came in 1853 and established the present town site. It was named by George Bennet, an Irish peer, who settled nearby in 1873 and named the town after Bandon, Ireland, his native home.

Cranberries are an important crop that has been grown in Bandon since 1885, when Charles McFarlin planted vines he brought from Massachusetts. McFarlin had originally come to pan for gold in California. He didn't make his fortune, or even a living, so he turned to what he knew best. He brought vines from Cape Cod and planted them in the state's first cranberry bog near Hauser. This bog produced cranberries for eight decades. His variety adapted to growing conditions on the west coast. The variety was named McFarlin in his honor and is still the principal variety grown on the west coast.

For Bandon events, festivals, live entertainment and happenings go to our Oregon Coast Calendar.



Room with a View - Bandon Beach Motel
Bandon

BANDON -- When does a small motel win praise for location, location, location in Oregon?

When it’s surrounded on three sides by the Pacific Ocean.

The Bandon Beach Motel may be modest, yet it has one of the most spectacular locations of any hotel on the Pacific coast.

Few coastal hotels -- including large, luxury places with big price tags -- boast ocean views from three sides. This motel is poised perfectly at Coquille Point, overlooking haystack and arch rocks.

bandon-beach-motel-arial

At less than $100 some nights, the Bandon Beach Motel also boasts a spectacular beach, with everything from tidepools to sea caves. Puffins are nesting on the rocks in front of the hotel right now, as are seals and their new pups. Migrating whales are also in full view this season.

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Bandon's 67th Annual Cranberry Festival
Bandon

cranfestbanner

September 13-15, 2013

Bandon's Cranberry Festival started in 1946 to showcase the local cranberry industry. Bandon has long been known as the Cranberry Capital of Oregon and new bogs are being added every year.

While most of the local berries are made into juice concentrate or frozen, some are sold fresh or dried and can be found in our local stores, while still more are made into wine.

The Bandon Cranberry Festival parade is held on Saturday morning and grows larger every year, people come as far away as Humboldt County to participate.

After the parade, you will enjoy unique wares and great food from the many vendors, good music and tons of fun.

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The Cheese is Back in Bandon
Bandon

PicCheeseHorizOn my first trip to Bandon over 10 years ago, I visited the Bandon Cheese Factory for the first time. I visited dozens of times after that first taste of curd. But, shortly after moving to Bandon, the Bandon Cheese factory was purchased by Tillamook Cheese and shortly after that, Tillamook closed the doors on cheese-making in Bandon.

That was truly a sad day for everyone in Bandon. And for years afterwards tourists would come back to Bandon and the first thing they would ask is, “Where is the cheese factory?”, or “What happened to the cheese?”

Well, after a long hiatus from cheese-making, Bandon is back in the cheese business with the new Face Rock Creamery opening formally today.

After final approval from the Oregon Agriculture Department, the first batch of Bandon cheese was produced at the Face Rock Creamery in April. Curds will be available in unflavored, jalapeno and garlic and fromage blanc. Cheddar cheese will come in straight-up cheddar and garlic. Various other cheese types will be available in the near future as well as some offerings from other Oregon and local cheese makers.

Website: http://facerockcreamery.com/

 
Bandon Fish Market
Bandon
The wait for a table is worth it, in any weather.
We haven't tasted smoked salmon chowder anywhere on the Oregon coast that matches this silky version with generous bites of not-too-salty salmon.
At $4.25 for a bowl and $8.95 for a bread bowl, this chowder is a great deal for lunch, snack or early dinner.
New England chowder is even more of a bargain at $4.25 for a chunky bowl or $8.95 for a bread bowl.
Fish and chips are the most popular menu item at this tiny eatery, priced at $10.95 to $11.95. Unlike many larger seafood places on the coast, the Bandon Fish Market is careful about its labels, so everyone knows the catch is wild. It's not just cod here, it's Pacific True Cod; same with Pacific Snapper and wild salmon.
A halibut burger is a real treat at $6.95, or there are fresh oyster shooters at $1.45 each. Stuffed clams -- with cheese, onions and peppers -- are only $1.10 to eat on the spot or to take home.
All the fresh catch, from halibut to salmon, is available to take home too. Especially popular are Oregon's sustainable bay shrimp, at $5.49/lb. A seafood cocktail with local shrimp is $5.50.
The crab and smoked salmon salads we ordered another day were so loaded with seafood ($8.50-$13.00), we saved half of each to take back to our hotel, so that we could dine at the beach, while watching one of Bandon's famous sunsets.
The Bandon Fish Market has been in business almost 30 years, and expanded in 2011 to meet demand for more indoor dining, with waterfront windows.
Picnic tables allow dockside dining, so you can watch fishing boats going out -- and your lunch being hauled in.
Bandon Fish Market, 249 1st St. S.E., Bandon. (541) 347-4282.
Open 11-6 most days, depending on weather; Sundays, 11-4.
By Kathleen Kenna
All photos by Hadi Dadashian

bandon-fish-market3Two signs that the Bandon Fish Market is a popular eatery with locals:

1. It's standing-room-only on a rainy day, long past lunch hour in late afternoon.

2. All the fish and seafood in the display case have bright orange "FRESH" signs.

The wait for a table is worth it, in any weather.

We haven't tasted smoked salmon chowder anywhere on the Oregon coast that matches this silky version with generous bites of not-too-salty salmon.

At $4.25 for a bowl and $8.95 for a bread bowl, this chowder is a great deal for lunch, snack or early dinner.

New England chowder is even more of a bargain at $4.25 for a chunky bowl or $8.95 for a bread bowl.

Fish and chips are the most popular menu item at this tiny eatery, priced at $10.95 to $11.95. Unlike many larger seafood places on the coast, the Bandon Fish Market is careful about its labels, so everyone knows the catch is wild. It's not just cod here, it's Pacific True Cod; same with Pacific Snapper and wild salmon.

Read more...
 
California Teen finds 7 year old message in a bottle while beachcombing on the Oregon Coast
Bandon

By Bill Lindelof for The Sacramento Bee

Sacramento Bee PhotoBeachcombers can search a lifetime and never come upon what 14-year-old Stuart Woodhall found.

Woodhall, from the Penn Valley in Nevada County, was on vacation with his family in Oregon during spring break, roaming a beach south of Coos Bay after a strong Pacific storm.

He spied a glass bottle, watertight thanks to a rubber stopper, deposited by waves among some rocks.

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The once and future marsh: An Oregon Coast Salt Marsh to be restored
Bandon

In Bandon, Oregon, a salt marsh is re-engineered

By Katy Muldoon for the Oregonian

Photo_of_Bandon_Marsh_National_Wildlife_RefugeRoy Lowe steers a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service pickup through a pock-marked pasture where cows grazed for more than a century. Before the mud gets too deep, he parks, steps out and climbs atop a dike that has held back the South Coast's cool, green Coquille River all those years.

It won't much longer.

Late this summer, after more than a decade of planning, partnerships and property deals, years of scientific study, engineering and a little experimentation, the river will spill across 418 acres, marking the biggest tidal marsh restoration ever attempted in Oregon.

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Oregon Coast Windfest in Bandon Aug 4-5 2012
Bandon

BandonWindfestAll backyard inventors and art vendors show their stuff on the Bandon Boardwalk from 10am 'til Dusk on August 4 and 5 2012

Kid rides, food, exhibits and vendors for wind related gizmos, gadgets, and whirly-gigs.

Prizes will be awarded.

 
Simpli The Best Fashion at the simply beautiful Oregon Coast
Bandon

You are invited to the first ever Sympli the Best Preview-Before-Market at Devon's Boutique in Bandon, Oregon

Simpli The BestFabulous samples of upcoming styles will be shipped from New York for ten days only.

Yes, you can preview, get feedback from your friends and order new designs before they hit the market.

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The Sound of Music will come alive in Bandon, Oregon
Bandon

The Bandon Playhouse in conjunction with the 10th Anniversary Year of the Sprague Community Theater will come alive with The Sound of Music. Running for three weekends starting February 19th and going thru March 7th, this classic and endearing musical is based on the book The Story of the Trapp Family Singers. It features an unforgettable Rodgers and Hammerstein score, including “My Favorite Things,” “Do-Re-Mi” and “Climb Every Mountain.”

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Beautiful Photo of Bandon, Oregon sea stars and anemones
Bandon

Bandon SeastarsMary went on a photography tour of the Oregon coast.

After taking sunrise shots at Bandon Beach, Mary walked around the sea stacks while the tide was out, looking for sea stars and anemones with a reflection in the water.

Sea stars have no brains and no blood; their nervous systems are spread through their arms, and their "blood" is actually filtered sea water.

Featured Image from the Quad City Photography Club

 

 

 
Population of Western Snowy Plovers in Oregon is increasing
Bandon

Snowy PloverAfter 20 years of recovery efforts, the population of western snowy plovers in Oregon is increasing, but the small shorebird is still vulnerable.

The plover’s numbers had decreased for decades, mainly due to the loss of nesting habitat to non-native European beachgrass, but also because of predators, such as fox, crows, ravens and skunks. Direct human disturbance and human development also contributed to the bird’s decline.

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Pelicans converge on Bandon Oregon's offshore rocks, river
Bandon

brownpelicanIf you’ve been to the beaches in the past week or the South Jetty, it’s been hard to miss these lumbering visitors on the offshore rocks, ocean and river. Thousands of brown pelicans have converged on the south and central Oregon coast, with fall migration is under way to Southern California and Mexico.

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